Kelly Fleck

Kelly Fleck is the editor of the Nikkei Voice, a Japanese-Canadian national newspaper. A recent graduate of Carleton University's journalism and communication program, she volunteered with the paper for years before taking on the job. Working at Nikkei Voice, Fleck has her finger on the pulse of Japanese Canadian culture and community.

Updated July 2018

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Monarch Butterflies Connect Seniors To Nature And Memories

TORONTO — On a hot summer afternoon, in the cool shade of the gardens at McCowan Retirement Residences, a group of seniors gathered, buzzing with excitement as they prepared to release newly-hatched monarch butterflies. One at a time, they held the butterflies carefully by the wings, and when they let go, they flew up into the sky and out of sight. When it was her turn, Pat Adachi delicately let go of the monarch, where it decided to rest on her hand instead. “I’m not a nature person. As a kid, we lived in the city all the time, in Vancouver. But I became interested when …

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Contemporary Dancer Takako Segawa listens for the Echoes of Ancestors in New Dance Film

OTTAWA — Performed to haunting music and set in the melting, snowy landscape of Petawawa’s Heritage Village, contemporary dancer Takako Segawa‘s new dance film honours the legacy of the Japanese Canadians sent to the prisoner of war camps 80 years earlier. As a first-generation Japanese immigrant, Segawa pays tribute to the Japanese Canadians who arrived before her, the hardships they faced, and offers healing in her own way. Called Sho ga nai – It can’t be helped, Segawa was inspired by the use of the Japanese phrase sho ga nai or shikata ga nai regarding the f…

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Rediscovering an Incredible Story of Community and Resilience in New Westminster

In creating a children’s book about their grandmother’s life, cousins Lara Okihiro and Janis Bridger have uncovered their family’s prewar life in New Westminster, B.C. But while digging through archives, directories, photographs, documents, and family files, and with the help of their parents, aunts and uncles, second cousins, and their great uncle, Isi Nakazawa, the cousins also uncovered an incredible story of resilience and community from Japanese Canadians in New Westminster and their family’s part in that story. Rediscovering a 40-year-old newspaper article writt…

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Journalist Mary Ito’s Dive into the World of Podcasting

Toronto broadcast journalist Mary Ito never planned to jump into the podcasting world, but now listeners can catch her on two new podcasts, The CRAM Podcast and Passage to Wonderland. The former connects listeners to bold new ideas, and the latter invites listeners to put away their busy days and unwind with passages from exceptional pieces of literature. Ito’s dive into podcasting began with the endless delays from the pandemic on the second instalment of CRAM, a festival she launched in April of 2019. A learning festival like no other, CRAM united Toronto’s four universiti…

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Past and Present Collide in Artist Kellen Hatanaka's Exhibit SAFE | HOME

STRATFORD — In artist Kellen Hatanaka‘s installation SAFE | HOME at the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre is sculptures of sports memorabilia for the legendary Asahi Baseball Team. A teapot with the team’s colours and ASAHI name emblazoned across the front. An action figure with dark hair under a red striped baseball cap. An Asahi ’93 Championships commemorative bottle opener. But of course, the Vancouver Asahi never won a 1993 championship. The club disbanded in 1941 when Japanese Canadians were dispossessed and interned during the Second World War. …

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