Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, nativo de Nueva York, es profesor de historia en la Universidad de Quebec en Montreal , una institución franco-parlante  de Montreal, Canadá. Él es autor de los libros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Editorial de la Universidad de Harvard, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Editorial de la Universidad de Columbia, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (Editorial de la Universidad de California, 2012), y Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (Editorial de la Universidad de Illinois, 2012), The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (Editorial de la Universidad de Colorado, 2016), y coeditor de la antología Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (Editorial de la Universidad de Washington, 2008). Robinson es además coeditor del volumen de John Okada - The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2018). El último libro de Robinson es una antología de sus columnas, The Unsung Great: Portraits of Extraordinary Japanese Americans (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2020). Puede ser contactado al email robinson.greg@uqam.ca.

Última actualización en julio de 2021

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The Morgenthau Diaries and FDR's Troubling Views of Minorities

In a recent column, I described the detective work that I did to clear up a seemingly contradictory passage in a book by John Franklin Carter about Franklin Roosevelt's attitudes toward Japanese Americans. On another occasion, I had to deal with an even trickier piece of evidence that revealed FDR’s opinions concerning religious minorities. It required me not only to draw on my historical training, but on my experience working as a legal assistant. The question first arose when I was doing research at the Franklin D Roosevelt Library on FDR’s signing of Executive Order 906…

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Reflections on a Concocted Conversation

One of the first books of fiction published in the post-World War II era to reference the wartime removal of Japanese Americans was John Franklin Carter’s novel, The Catoctin Conversation. Carter’s novel, published in 1947 under the pen name Jay Franklin, revolves around an imaginary meeting in mid-1943 between US President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and the Nazi defector Ernst “Putzi” Hanfstaengl, as well as Bernard Baruch and Harry Hopkins. The author inserts himself as a character as well. There is an odd inconsistency in the …

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Nikkei in Motown: Masao Hirata, Diego Rivera and Japanese in Detroit

One of the splendors of the city of Detroit is the Detroit Art Institute, a museum that boasts collections of painting, sculpture and objects drawn from around the world. A special highlight is the museum’s interior courtyard, site of the Detroit Industry murals. This series of 27 frescos, commissioned by museum director Wilhelm Valentiner with financing from automobile baron Edsel Ford, was created between 1932 and 1933 by the renowned Mexican artist Diego Rivera, who is said to have considered the work his finest achievement. The murals are comprised of two main panels that portray …

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In Tribute to Roger Daniels: The Father of Us All

The distinguished historian Roger Daniels died on December 9, 2022. In the past days, I have taken a lot of time to reflect on how he influenced me, both professionally and personally. I first met Roger in January 1998, at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. I was then at a crucial crossroads in my life. A year earlier, after quitting graduate school and abandoning in the process a half-finished dissertation, I had uncovered intriguing and disturbing evidence of Franklin Roosevelt’s race-based hostility to Japanese Americans during the 1920s, when he had endorsed…

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Bradford Smith: An American to Japan (and Back) — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> In February 1942, Bradford Smith was recruited by Alan Cranston, the future U.S. Senator, for a job with the Office of War Information (then called the Office of Facts and Figures). In April of that year, he left his teaching position at Bennington and moved to Washington, D.C. to take a position with OWI Foreign Language Division, headed by Cranston. In keeping with his own assumed expertise on Japan, Smith was assigned to head OWI’s “Japan desk.” There he worked to ensure the loyalty of immigrant and foreign-language groups. As is indicated by his …

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